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Adoption Services

Adoption is the legal process through which a child becomes part of a new family. It is intended to provide the child permanence and security. The CFSA (Child and Family Services Act) regulates the adoption of children in Ontario and protects the rights of everyone involved in an adoption; the child, the child’s birth parents and the adoptive parents.

Are you thinking of adopting a child?

Parents who adopt must be mature and flexible to meet the needs of children who come from a variety of backgrounds. They may also need to develop awareness and special skills so the child feels comfortable in their new family. When you contact the CAS about adoption you will be provided with an information package and subsequently an adoption worker will attend your home to discuss the process and answer any questions you might have. If you decide to proceed, a Home Study will be conducted. Participation in training is required. Working through this process assists in the decision whether adoption is right for you and what type of child best fits into your family.

Are you thinking about placing your child for adoption?

It may help to discuss your options with a CAS worker to make the best plan for your child. The decision is still yours, whether you keep your child or choose adoption.

About Adoption Disclosure

In May 2008, the Ontario legislature passed an adoption information disclosure law called “Access to Adoption Records Act, 2008” which gives adopted adults and birth parents more rights to information and privacy through the Adoption Disclosure Register.

For more information about adoption, please call the CAS-HN at 519-587-5437 or 1-888-CAS-KIDS to speak to an adoption worker; or visit the Ministry of Children and Youth website at: www.children.gov.on.ca

Helping Children and Youth find their Forever Families

Adoption is an option for over 8,000 children and youth in Ontario

November is Adoption Awareness Month in Ontario and all over the province, the Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies (OACAS) and Children’s Aid Societies are spreading the message that all children and youth deserve to have forever families and lifelong connections they can count on.

What is a forever family? It’s a lifelong, permanent connection to an adult through adoption, legal custody, kinship care (care by a relative or someone known to the child), or customary care. Having this connection is extremely important as it provides an adult to turn to through all of life’s celebrations and challenges; it’s a safe place to come home to, and a sense of stability all of which are so important to the development of a child. Last year, more than 830 children were connected to their forever family by adoption through the public system. Over 3,000 children found permanency through legal custody, adoption, kinship care, or customary care.

There are more than 8,000 children and youth in the care of Ontario’s Children’s Aid Societies who are looking for their forever family. The majority of these children and youth are between the ages of 13 and 18, yet they represent a small percentage of those being adopted. Last year, children between 13 and 18 represented 61% of the 8,000 children needing permanent families, yet only 3.6% of these children were adopted through Ontario’s public adoption system. Regardless of their age or situation, all of these children need a permanent connection. To help support these children and youth, the government of Ontario announced subsidies to families, who adopt or become legal custodians to sibling groups, and/or youth over the age of ten years in June. Visit http://bit.ly/SVRE9z to read more about the announcement.

Some of the children needing forever families are siblings looking to stay together. For Farion and Tracy they knew they wanted to grow their family but didn’t know how special the connection to their children would be. “Although we are grateful to have each other, somehow we felt that something was missing from our lives. Like a puzzle that isn’t quite complete without the last piece. That is until we met siblings Katie and Barry.”

“Having these children to share our lives with is such a great gift. At the end of the day we want our children to know that they will always have a place where they feel safe and loved. We’ve found the piece that was missing from our puzzle,” said Farion and Tracy.

Other children needing forever families are children with special needs. For Becky and Mitchell*, adoption came as an unexpected surprise. “One of the students in a special needs class I came to work at was living in a foster home, the same home he had been living in since he was a year old. When the placement suddenly became disrupted he was abruptly moved to a new home, and his world turned upside down. David returned to school after this a very scared and confused little boy. He would make comments about just wanting a family to love him, and didn’t want to go “home”. Mitchell and I knew David had to be a part of our family.”

“Later we met Sam who has cerebral palsy. Of course, Mitchell and I couldn’t resist falling for Sam as well, and we started making inquiries about adopting him in the fall of that year. We wouldn’t change the path that led us to be the parents of these amazing people. They are happy, healthy, secure, and loved with us, and that makes all the difference to them and us.”

The Haldimand and Norfolk Children’s Aid Society is looking for people who are open to parenting special needs children, sibling groups and/or older children. “For us, adoption has always been a natural process for creating a family….Older kids are awesome, especially once they hit an age where they have distinct personalities,” said Elizabeth, adopted mother of an older child with special needs.

For more information on adoption contact The Children’s Aid Society of Haldimand and Norfolk at 1-888-227-5437.

Happy Family Day


The Children’s Aid Society of Haldimand and Norfolk would like to wish all the families in our communities a happy Family Day.

Family Day has been celebrated on the third Monday of February every year since it was introduced by Alberta in 1990. Saskatchewan adopted the holiday in 2007 and Ontario followed in 2008.

This year, the statutory holiday falls on Monday, February 15, 2010. The holiday was introduced to break the long stretch of work and weather between New Years Day and March Break.

Take the time to enjoy the long weekend with your families.

Thank you Community Living Haldimand


Community Living Haldimand, located in Cayuga provides individualized support to those with mental health issues and teaches them life skills, budgeting and social skills. Through support and advocacy, they are responsible for assuring that individuals with intellectual disabilities are treated with dignity and respect.

They have also extended their altruism by offering support to families in the community. Heather Putt from Community Living contacted the Children’s Aid Society of Haldimand and Norfolk seeking a family in need to sponsor at Christmas.

Once a family and their needs were identified, the response from Community Living and its staff was nothing short of spectacular and heart warming.

Ms. Putt reported that she was overwhelmed with the response of staff, “It has been remarkable. We have collected about three pick up truck loads worth of clothes, toys, food, beds and bedding.”

The Children’s Aid Society of Haldimand and Norfolk wishes to express our thanks to Community Living for the remarkable work they do and the generosity they have displayed.

OACAS and ACO launch Adoption Awareness Month in Ontario



 TORONTO – The Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies (OACAS) and the Adoption Council of Ontario (ACO) are launching a campaign to increase awareness about the thousands of children and youth in care who are waiting for a family.

The OACAS and the ACO are promoting adoption for children in care, through the Adoption Awareness campaign during November, because “one day, every child in Ontario will have a family.”

When: Tuesday, November 3, 2009 at 10:00 a.m.

Where: 75 Front Street, Toronto, Ontario, 3rd floor, major intersection Church and Front streets.

What: OACAS and ACO will launch Adoption Awareness Month with guest speakers:

Robin Cardozo is an adoptive parent and was a member of the Ontario Government’s Expert Panel on Infertility and Adoption.

Paula Schuck is an adoptive mother and freelance journalist from London, Ontario, cofounder of the London Coalition of Adoptive Families and the Canadian Coalition of Adoptive Families.

Aleisha Jane Murray Deece-Cassidy is a Grade 8 student who loves math and enjoys speaking publicly about adoption. She hopes to make many people aware of the joys and challenges associated with the adoption process

Please contact your local Children’s Aid Society of Haldimand and Norfolk for more details at 1-888-227-5437.

Recognizing our Foster Families


Thank you Foster Parents.

Last week, on October 20, 2009, The Children’s Aid Society of Haldimand and Norfolk recognized the contributions of our foster parents through an annual dinner. The occasion was marked with acknowledgements to several foster families for esteemed service and their continued commitment to children and youth in Haldimand and Norfolk by reaching 5, 10, 15 and 25 year milestones.

Haldimand Mayor, Marie Trainer who attended the dinner commended the work of foster parents as being, “very important to the community.”

At this time, The Children’s Aid Society of Haldimand and Norfolk has approximately 323 youth and children in care. Many of these children are being provided homes and support by 102 foster families in our communities.

The care of youth and children is the utmost responsibility of everyone in the community. Foster families and individuals have an essential role by providing stability and a caring home that encourages a child or youth’s growth and development.

If you have ever considered fostering please contact us at 1-888-227-5437.




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